The Weather Within

Umair Zia's Nature Tutor_Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

The day is cold, and dark, and dreary;
It rains, and the wind is never weary;
The vine still clings to the mouldering wall,
But at every gust the dead leaves fall,
And the day is dark and dreary.

My life is cold, and dark, and dreary;
It rains, and the wind is never weary;
My thoughts still cling to the mouldering Past,
But the hopes of youth fall thick in the blast,
And the days are dark and dreary.

Be still, sad heart! and cease repining;
Behind the clouds is the sun still shining;
Thy fate is the common fate of all,
Into each life some rain must fall,
Some days must be dark and dreary.

Everyone can find something that relates to them in nature. In this particular case, the weather without is in accordance with the weather within, it reflects the internal monologue of the poet. This is a perfect example of how nature has multiple sides, that the world ain’t all sunshine or rainbows. Even the rain has a melancholic element to it, the gloomy atmosphere coinciding with the problems the poet is facing in life. In this rain depicts the problems one faces occasionally in this world.
Title: The Rainy Day
Year of Poem: 1847
Writer: Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
Birthplace of Writer: United States